Tidbits, Tips, & Tidings

About the Blog

Tidbits, Tips & Tidings is a blog from Library Director, Beth Carpenter. Tidbits will share info about library services, helpful tools & websites, answers to patron suggestions, tips & tricks on how to use different library resources, and more.

National Novel Writing Month

Keep Calm and Write On

[This is a guest post by Library Assistant, Bethany Huse.]

Come write in! Join us for this year’s NaNoWriMo – the National Novel Writing Month! Every November the online writing community celebrates NaNoWriMo with a challenge, try to write a novel in a month. This year, Kimberly-Little Chute Library will be joining the challenge and offering writing space every Wednesday 10-2 in Little Chute and Thursday 6-8 in Kimberly for the month of November. Work with fellow writers, brainstorm ideas, or just enjoy the company!

Starting in 1999 with 21 people in the San Francisco Bay area wanting to get together, NaNoWriMo has undergone many changes over the past 16 years. In 2013, NaNoWriMo counted 310,000 adult novelists with an additional 89,500 young writers. Becoming an international nonprofit novel-writing organization took a lot of work and growth over the years, but with support from writing lovers, NaNoWrimo has become an annual event that numerous people have participated in.

Beyond NaNoWriMo, the organization also has created The Young Writers Program that promotes “writing fluency, creative education, and the pure joy of novel-writing in K-12 classrooms (http://nanowrimo.org/about).” Camp NaNoWriMo is another program from the organization, this being a virtual retreat that offers tools, resources, and a community for any writing project. Finally, the Come Write In program is designed to encourage writing spaces around local communities. Libraries, coffee stores, and bookstores are the target locations for this program. Being a registered Come Write In location provides writers to come together and work, brainstorm, and write with a community and support.

Kimberly-Little Chute Public Library is happy to say that this year we will be a Come Write In location and invite all writers to join us. If you’d like to participate as a NaNoWriMo member, sign up at http://nanowrimo.org, however, you do not need to be a member to attend the Come Write In dates. We hope to see you soon, pen (or laptop) in hand! Let the writing begin!

Wisconsin's Digital Library

Digital content has taken the world by storm and continues to increase in usage every day. As people embrace smart phones, tablets, and e-readers as part of their lives, it becomes more convenient to access digital books, audio and video on the go.

The Kimberly-Little Chute Public Library has provided digital content for many years now and continues to develop digital collections collaboratively as a part of the Wisconsin Public Library Consortium (WPLC). WPLC provides e-books, downloadable audiobooks, and streaming videos via Wisconsin’s Digital Library available at http://dbooks.wplc.info/.

Missed watching Silver Linings Playbook or The King’s Speech? Stream it tonight! Looking for some great books to load up your e-reader for vacation? Download free e-books and audiobooks! Your Kimberly-Little Chute library card gives you FREE access to all of the materials in Wisconsin’s Digital Library.

And here’s more good news – the Digital Library recently added 87 digital magazines to the online collection. Now you can download titles such as HGTV Magazine, Outdoor Life, Taste of Home, The Family Handyman, Martha Stewart Living, The New Yorker, Popular Science, Field & Stream, O Magazine, Fine Gardening, Mental Floss, and many more. The digital magazines work with the OverDrive and Nook apps. More details can be found online at http://tinyurl.com/po49nf5.

While access to digital content continues to grow, the library still recognizes the need for print collections to be developed and sustained. E-content isn’t everyone’s cup of tea & not everyone has access to devices that allow the use of online content. Even more so, some people just love the feel (and yes, even the smell!) of a printed book in their hands. And there is no greater pleasure than sitting with a child in your lap and a book out in front of you as you read and enjoy a fabulous picture book.

Whatever your cup of tea, the library strives to provide materials in a variety of formats so the reader in you is inspired to continue to learn and grow.

Time for a Big Library Read!

This month's Big Library Read features two Young Adult novels:

  1. The Door in the Hedge by Robin McKinley
  2. In the Shadow of Blackbirds by Cat Winters

Both titles will be available in digital format from OverDrive from October 7th through the 21st with no waiting lists during the program. All you need is your library card to get started! Read the books and join the conversation by using the hashtag #BigLibraryRead.

Learn more about the Big Library Read at biglibraryread.com.

Suggestion Box: Hours

We get requests about the library's open hours fairly often. Some people want earlier, some later, some more hours on the weekends. Here's the latest:

For the record, we would love to be able to open earlier in the day (and every night of the week)! However, we only have funding to support a certain number of hours per day/week/month, and the current funding won't support adding hours. In fact, at the beginning of 2015, the library had to cut hours of service because approved staffing levels couldn't support the number of hours the library was open. This is further complicated by the fact that we have two locations to service rather than one.

When we made the change in January of this year, we examined traffic patterns - both in check outs and in door counts, providing service to people of all ages, and how to keep both library locations open as much as possible. While some might want the library open earlier in the day, traffic use also indicates that use in the evening is as strong as morning activity. We also need to be available at hours when students may be coming in to find homework resources. In addition to those factors, we need to be cognizant of library programming - when do we offer story time and how long do evening adult programs typically run. It's no easy feat to figure out the ideal schedule for all people, and we realize that we won't be able to make everyone happy.

We appreciate the input, so keep it coming! If there's a big push for earlier open hours, we can re-examine our current schedule to see if there's any way to accommodate the requests. Not all things will be possible due to our budget constraints, but we are willing to constantly review and ponder different solutions.

Banned Books Week 2015

Banned Books

[This is a guest post from Angela Schneider, Programming & Adult Services Librarian.]

Harry Potter… Captain Underpants… Catcher in the Rye…

Every year, there are hundreds of attempts to remove books from the shelves of bookstores, libraries and schools. Celebrate the freedom to read what you want, and the library’s promise to help make that possible, during Banned Books Week, September 27 - October 3, 2015. Visit the library to check out a frequently challenged title, now on display.

The American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) receives reports from libraries, schools, and the media on attempts to ban books in communities across the country. They compile lists of challenged books in order to inform the public about censorship efforts that affect libraries and schools. The top ten most frequently challenged books of 2014 include:

  1. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie. Reasons: anti-family, cultural insensitivity, drugs/alcohol/smoking, gambling, offensive language, sex education, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group, violence. Additional reasons: “depictions of bullying.”
  2. Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi. Reasons: gambling, offensive language, political viewpoint. Additional reasons: “politically, racially, and socially offensive,” “graphic depictions.”
  3. And Tango Makes Three, Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell. Reasons: Anti-family, homosexuality, political viewpoint, religious viewpoint, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “promotes the homosexual agenda.”
  4. The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison. Reasons: Sexually explicit, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “contains controversial issues.”
  5. It’s Perfectly Normal, by Robie Harris. Reasons: Nudity, sex education, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group. Additional reasons: “alleges it child pornography.”
  6. Saga, by Brian Vaughan and Fiona Staples. Reasons: Anti-Family, nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group.
  7. The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini. Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited to age group, violence.
  8. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky. Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, homosexuality, offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group. Additional reasons: “date rape and masturbation.”
  9. A Stolen Life, Jaycee Dugard. Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group.
  10. Drama, by Raina Telgemeier. Reasons: sexually explicit.

Source: http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks

According to the American Library Association, “Our goal is not to focus on the numbers, but to educate the community that censorship is still a very serious problem. Even with all of our efforts to follow up and provide support, surveys indicate that up to 85% of book challenges receive no media attention and remain unreported.” For more information on ALA's efforts to raise awareness of censorship and promote the freedom to read, please explore Banned Books Week.